snow_on_king_street

“Snow on King Street,” a view of Downtown Boone in the winter likely during the 1930s. Image courtesy of the archives of the Historic Boone Society, Watauga County Public Library, and NC Digital Heritage, library.digitalnc.org.

January 12, 1933

“COOLIDGE AT REST IN VERMONT HILLS; DIED ON THURSDAY’ was a prominent headline on the front page of this week’s edition of the Watauga Democrat, introducing a news article which gave details about the passing of the United States’ thirtieth President, who served from 1923 to 1929. Began the report, after a dateline of “Plymouth, Vt.,” “Calvin Coolidge said recently he hoped to spend more and more of his time in this obscure mountain village from which he had sprung to fame. Saturday that wish was consummated. He was laid to rest in the hillside cemetery beside six generations of his forebears.” The article noted that, “death occurred suddenly Thursday afternoon at Northampton, Mass., where he had resided since leaving the presidency four years ago.” Information about the presidential funeral told the newspaper’s readers that,”[i]n the Edwards Church where he had worshiped for many years, a funeral service of impressive simplicity was held Saturday… Although the nation’s great were present, the ceremony was marked by the same homely dignity that had characterized the famous New Englander’s political career.” Wrote the unnamed reporter, “President and Mrs Hoover, Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt and her son James were among those who paid him silent tribute. But there was no pomp, no display. The very atmosphere of the church was severe. In a pew close to the front of the church sat Michael Fitzgerald, former mayor, who was the city’s chief executive when Mr. Coolidge was formerly notified he had been elected vice-president. Fitzgerald, now a barber, made an address of welcome on that occasion.”

January 19, 1950
‘GUNMAN IS TAKEN AS CHASE ENDS,” a banner headline this week, was followed by a story relating that, “Carl Robert Ricker, one  of the gunmen sought for 30 hours in a Watauga manhunt conducted by the State highway patrol, federal and local officers, was captured last Wednesday afternoon near Rominger, and the following day the hunt for his companion ended, when it became apparent he had made his escape into Tennessee.” According to the report, “Ricker, of Midway, Tenn., with one or more companions had been the object of a (sic) intense search since the car which they were driving crashed into a ditch near Vilas Tuesday morning.” Allegedly, “[t]he automobile the gunman occupied had been stolen in Alabama and the Georgia license plates taken near Atlanta. They are believed to have robbed a Ford place at Thomasville, Ga., and Ricker is reported to have served time for a number of auto theft violations.” Interestingly, the story noted that the “wrecked automobile contained a sawed off shotgun, outboard motor, movie projectors, auto tires, car batteries, a variety of Notary seals, electric drill, typewriter and other items.”

“Burley Market To Close Today” was a brief notice of the seasonal end to business for the local exchange for tobacco growers and buyers. “The Boone burley tobacco market closes Thursday for the season, it is announced by Roscoe Coleman, warehouseman, who reports a splendid season, although the weight of the tobacco offered has been rather less than usual.” Concluded the short item, “Mr. Coleman states that through Monday night the market has sold 3, 750,000 pounds at an average of approximately $44.00 per hundred.”

coolidge

From the Watauga Democrat, Boone, North Carolina, USA; page one; Thursday, January 12, 1933.

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Published in: on January 23, 2017 at 6:00 am  Leave a Comment  

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