December 26

junaluska_4_soldiers_with_dog

Four men in military uniforms and a canine companion, possibly taken during the American forces occupation of Germany after World War II. Courtesy of the Harrison-Boone-Grimes Family Home Collection / Junaluska Heritage Association and the Digital Watauga Project / DigitalWatauga.org.

December 20, 1900

“Friend George A. Bryan,” began a local news item in this week’s edition of the Watauga Democrat, “who has been at the State Hospital in Morganton for some months, undergoing a course of treatment, returned home Sunday, and it gives us much pleasure to state that he is almost his old self again, his physical strength, though, has not yet returned in full. George has many friends here who are glad to see his smiling face again.”

“Vases, toys, a variety of dolls, fruits, candies, and a full line of other Christmas goods just in at Holsclaw’s,” announced another notice.

 “THE BEST PLASTER,” the heading to an advertisement this week, was followed by details which promised, “[a] piece of flannel dampened with Chamberlain’s Pain Balm and bound to the effected (sic) parts is superior to any plaster. When troubled with lame back or pains in the side or chest, give it a trial and you are certain to be more than pleased with the prompt relief which it affords. Pain Balm also cures rheumatism. One application will give relief.” Concluded the ad, “for sale by Blackburn.”

“The American soldiers in China cannot be too careful of their actions,” warned a world news item, reproduced from the Concord Tribune. “The world’s eye is on China and the behavior of some of the allied forces is a disgrace to civilization,” opined the Concord paper’s writer. “They have outdone the Boxers in committing deeds of violence and murder. We have long since learned that their ways are not ours. We have a different mission in China, different views and ideas. Above all let’s keep our hands clean regardless of what the European powers do. Let murder and outrages be at other doors.”

December 28, 1933

“BETTER BUSINESS THIS CHRISTMAS THAN LAST YEAR,” proclaimed a bold headline in this edition of the newspaper. Under the byline “New York,” the accompanying article related that, “it’s a merrier Christmas in the business world this year. Holiday festivities find leading industrial indices not only well above their 1933 lows but also above 1932 minimums, most of which were recorded late last December as the country began to sink into the troublesome situation that lead to the banking holiday.”

Local reporting of the upturn in holiday spending was found under the heading, “HOLIDAY TRADE BEST IN YEARS, SAY RETAILERS.” According to the story, “[t]he last days of the week comprised the busiest period for Boone merchants since the panic got going, according to general belief among the shopkeepers, and sales forces were glad when late Saturday night they could retire from the milling throngs and began to make delayed preparations for their individual Christmas festivities.” The article reported that, “many merchants report a one hundred per cent increase in holiday trade over the same period a year ago.”

“CHRISTMAS TREE EVENT,” a short local news item, told that a “neighborhood Christmas tree and appropriate program combined to make a pleasant affair for the people of the Cool Springs school district last Saturday evening. Under the leadership of Mr. Dewey Mitchell, the teacher, local talent was used in presenting ‘The Prodigal Son,’ and the audience was large.”

 

 

 

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Published in: on December 26, 2016 at 6:00 am  Leave a Comment  

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