October 17

observation_point_grandfather_mountain

“Observation Point, Grandfather Mountain. Linville, N.C.,” a photograph of unknown date. Courtesy of the Bobby Brendell collection, the Watauga County Historical Society, and digitalwatauga.omeka.net / the Digital Watauga project.

 1944: Pig Feed Evaluated in Contest at Farmer’s Co-Op

October 11, 1900

An advertisement in this week’s issue of the Watauga Democrat newspaper bore the bold heading, “Rail-Road Coming, with a Car-Load of Goods for the People of Watauga Co.” The body of the ad advised readers that, “[t]hey are going at very low prices. Call and see them for yourselves. The stock consists of Dry Goods, Notions, Groceries, Carpets, Mattings, Ladies’ capes, Faccinator, etc. You will find a complete line of all kinds of Patent Medicines usually sold in this section. I also carry a full line of men’s[,] women[‘s] and children’s fine and coarse shoes that are going at cost.” “COTTON JEANS AT COST,” the advertisement continued on, “Large stock of Plaids, Domestics, Outings, Flannels, Crock-ware, Fruit Jars[,] men’s Hats, 60 cents and up to $2.75. Coffee, sugar, spice, etc., always on hand. You will find a complete line of coffin goods, shelf hardware, farmer[‘]s friend[,] plow repairs always on hand. I will sell all cheap.” The business of this diversified General Store also involved buying local farm products. “WANTED: Butter, Eggs, Chickens, Feathers, Wheat Rye, and 300 bushels of dry peach seeds, for all of which I will pay the highest market prices.” The notice closed, “YOURS ANXIOUS TO PLEASE, WILL W. HOLSCLAW, Vilas, N.C., Sept. 6.” A “Faccinator” seems to have been a “fascinator”, a decorative headpiece with a clip or comb worn by women.

This week’s paper also included advertising for several colleges and universities in the state. “University of North Carolina. The Head of the State’s Educational System,” began one. “Three academic courses leading to Degrees. Professional course in Law, Medicine and Pharmacy. Summer School for Teachers. Tuition $60. Scholarships and Loans to Needy. Free Tuition to Candidates for Ministry, Minister’s Sons and Teachers. 512 students besides 61 in Summer School. 38 teachers in the faculty. For catalogues and information address F.P. VENABLE, President, Chapel Hill, N.C.”

October 12, 1944

“Pig Feeding Test is Being Made at Local Farm Co-op Store,” a headline at the bottom of this week’s front page amidst news article about World War II and treatment for polio patients, began, “[t]he Watauga Farm Co-operative store on Monday instituted a pig feeding contest, which is the source of much interest among the many farmers who visit the establishment.” Continued the item, “[t]wo Berkshire pigs, named Lum and Abner, weight 62 and 53 pounds, respectively, are in separate pens, side by side. The lighter of the two pigs is being fed Purina Hog Ration, while the other is getting a ration of a good grade of bran and wheat shorts, such as is the ration of the average hog. To demonstrate the value of the Purina feed an accurate record will be kept of the growth of the two pigs. They will be weighted weekly, the gains in poundage and the cost per pound gain figured for each. The demonstration will continue for 90 days, after which a complete record will be released, and the hogs will be slaughtered and displayed.” Concluded the story, “[t]he novel demonstration is attracting many to the popular farmers’ store.”

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Published in: on October 17, 2016 at 6:00 am  Leave a Comment  

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