September 26

tourist_home_mrs_a_c_mast_sugar_grove_web

“Tourist Home– Mrs. A.C. Mast’s Tourist Home, Sugar Grove, N.C.” Courtesy of the Bobby Brendell collection, the Watauga County Historical Society, and digitalwatauga.omeka.net.

1943: Churchill Predicts ‘Big Three’ Summit, Invasion of Nazi-Held Europe

September 20, 1900

“Perhaps the greatest destruction to life and property that ever occurred at one time in the history of the United States (the John’s town (sic) [Pennsylvania] flood not accepted,” began an article in this week’s edition of the Watauga Democrat, “was the inundation by water of the city of Galveston, Texas, on the 9th. The wind traveled at the rate of 100 miles per hour sweeping everything in its path, and the tides ran so high that a large part of the city was entirely submerged, the combined elements entailing a loss of property that is estimated at $25,000,000 and the loss of at least 5,000 human lives.” Continued the Watauga Democrat’s report, “[t]o read of the horrors, the devastation, the loss of life and property in that once prosperous city, is enough to make the blood run cold in one[‘]s veins. The rich, the poor, the high, the low, of all classes and conditions have been sunk by hundreds into watery graves in the gulf, the rescuing parties not being able to bury them as fast as they were taken from under the piles of debris, into which the proud city was converted, by the merciless elements of wind and water.”
A related item in this same issue opened, “[a]s the people all over the United States are cheerfully responding to the cry of distress that is going up from the ill fated city of Galveston, Texas, is it not the duty of our people to respond to this cry, make up a purse for those poor unfortunate people, and help them provide food and shelter for themselves and families?” The writer urged Wataugans, “[l]et some active man take this matter in hand, call on all our people, get up a collection and forward at once by telegraph to those suffering people.” The appeal concluded, “[l]et us not be last in this duty.”

September 23, 1943

“CHURCHILL SEES MASS INVASION OF EUROPE,” a banner headline in this week’s newspaper which bore a dateline of “London, Sep. 21,” reported that, “Prime Minister Churchill declared today that the second front will be thrown open at ‘the right time’ and a mass invasion of the continent from the west will begin.” According to the report, Winston Churchill, leader of Great Britain, had told “the [British Parliament’s House of] Commons that the second front ‘already exists potentially’ and ‘already is rapidly gaining weight’.” Said Churchill, at a time when a front had already been opened against Nazi-held “Fortress Europe” by invasions of Italy from the south by Allied troops, another front had “not yet been thrown into play,” but, “[t]hat time is coming.” Churchill also revealed that he foresaw a “tripartite conference of representatives of the United States, Britain and Russia” which would “take place ‘at an early date’ and no question will be barred from discussion. Any differences will be set aside for a conference of President Roosevelt, Premier Stalin and the prime minister himself.” These three major leaders of the Allied forces did meet in Tehran late in 1943, then again in Yalta in the Crimea in February of 1945, and the promised invasion began on the beaches of Normandy in German-occupied France in June of that latter year.

 

 

 

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Published in: on September 26, 2016 at 6:00 am  Leave a Comment  

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