The Week of Sunday, April 21st, 2013.

Old Courthouse

 

This photograph bears the caption, “Watauga County Court House. Boone, N.C. Altitude 3332 feet. Highest East of the Rockies.” The building shown was built in 1904, just a few years before the article below noted recent legislation mandating that the North Carolina State Flag be flown over the courthouses of the state.

Courtesy of the archives of the ‘Historic Boone’ society

April 18, 1907

“Hagaman Items,” a column in this week’s edition of the Watauga Democrat newspaper, reported in this mid-April issue that “all farm work has been suspended until winter breaks.” Other news from the Hagaman community told, “there have been three marriages here since last Wednesday almost within a stone’s throw of each other, but we will be bound to postpone that business pretty soon on account of material” – or, perhaps, the author may have been implying, a lack of further eligible material.

“The law requiring the State flag to float above every court house is now in effect and we expect shortly to see it flung to the breeze from Catawba’s court house. The law requires that it be displayed every day, except when it rains, and that it be placed at half mast on the death of any State officer or other prominent official or citizen,” reported another item, attributed as having originally appeared in the Newton Enterprise. Continued this notice, with a parenthetical note from the editor of the Watauga Democrat, “Watauga, of course, comes under this law, but as yet we fail to see the flutter of a flag from the dome of our pretty county building. It is now up to some man or set of men to see that this law is complied with at once. – DEMOCRAT.”

April 21, 1932

“RABID DOG LEFT TRAIL OF DEATH UP COVE CREEK,” a bold and dramatic headline in this week’s edition, related that, “(a) telegram received by Dr. H.B. Perry last week from the State chemist indicates that the head of a sheep furnished by J.R. Mast of Sugar Grove, brought unmistable (sic) proof of hydrophobia, and since that time the extent of the depredations on Cove Creek from the recent raid of a rabid dog, have become more apparent, and the losses to the herds and flocks of breeders have already reached several hundred dollars.” The news story reported that “(a) number of the people of Cove Creek have started a campaign to rid their community of dogs, and a number of the beasts have been freely killed as a precaution. In the meantime, Messrs. Swift and Mast, who handled their stock more or less after they had been stricken, have made arrangements to make treatment in case they might have become infected.” No cases of human infection, however, were reported at the time of this report. The story concluded, though, that “a lookout for prowling dogs is expected to bring about a steady decline in the canine population.”

April 20, 1944

“Big Herb House Will Be Erected,” according to a feature on this week’s front page. Details of the story narrated that, “Mr. W.C. Greene, local building contractor, has accepted a contract for the construction of a large herb house for the Wilcox Drug Company, a government permit has been granted, and the work will start immediately.” The planned structure was to be “modern in every respect, and built particularly for the needs of the root and herb business.

Materials for this column are drawn from the microfilm archives of the Watauga Democrat newspaper, available at the Watauga County Public Library in Boone.

 

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Published in: on April 21, 2013 at 9:24 am  Leave a Comment  

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