The Week of Sunday, February 17th, 2013.

Historic Boone 1960 snow sculpture
Bearing a handwriting inscription on the reverse, “1960 snow – Snow sculpture of George Washington – Max Dixon (right),” this photograph from the aftermath of a winter mega-storm originally was published in the Watauga Democrat newspaper with the caption “Give Max Dixon and clan enough snow, and Boom! – George Washington!”

February 21, 1907

News this week in the Watauga Democrat newspaper included, in the report entitled the “Washington Letter,” a notice that, “Postmaster General Cortelyou has been working on a new scheme in connection with the dead letter office that is greatly expediting the work of that division of the Post Office Department and ought to result in giving a much more prompt and effective service than has ever been given to the public by the Department before. Instead of holding letters in the dead letter office for months at a time as has heretofore the practice, a large force of clerks has been put at work opening and inspecting misdirected mail as soon as it reaches the office.” Told the article, “all of the letters which can be returned to the senders are immediately forwarded and the aggregate value of this mail is shown from the fact that from $6000 to $10,000 a month is thus restored to small transmitters in the inspected letters.” Concluded this report, “in a little while it will be possible for all of the mail having the address of the sender inside to be returned as soon as it reaches the dead letter office.”

February 26, 1943

“Local Lad, With Royal Air Force, Says Hitler’s Doom In Sight; Bombs Berlin,” proclaimed a bold headline in this week’s newspaper. “Vance Taylor, son of Mr. and Mrs. Millard Taylor of Boone, who is now a Sergeant in the Royal Air Force Commandos, is in town this week, and while paying a call at the Democrat office, told of flying ‘high wide and handsome’ over Naziland, and even over the city of Berlin, while an understudy was delivering Herr Hitler’s speech for him a short time ago, and the local flier states that no one need be surprised if the German war machine is neatly folded up in about two months.” Sergeant Taylor, “who gives his age as 22, says he skipped class at Duke to go to Canada to enlist in the Royal Air Force 23 months ago, (and) that he was promptly sent to England for his training, where he has since been,” reported the Watauga Democrat article. The local pilot optimistically related to the local newspaper his belief that “the United nations (sic – e.g, the Allies; the organization of the United Nations had not yet been created) are rapidly closing in for the finish of Hitler’s Legions, and (he) says that the largest part of the R.A.F. will then be concerned with Tokyo.” The German surrender came, in fact, in May of 1945, 27 months after Taylor’s visit home to Watauga County. Taylor “was given a ride on an English submarine to this country, in company with a naval captain and some other seamen,” and would “board ship for the return to the battle skies next Friday midnight at an undisclosed port.”

February 18, 1965

“Foscoe, Sugar Grove Areas To Have $36,000 Phone Exchanges” reported on this date that, “Linville Lumber Company, Linville,” had won contracts in a recent bid-taking by Skyline Telephone company “for construction of a new building in Foscoe to house a new telephone exchange there and for the expansion of the Sugar Grove Exchange building to provide space for new exchange equipment.” According to the article, “Mr. G.W. Edwards, president of Skyline Telephone Membership Corporation,” reported that the new facilities were necessary due to “the unusual growth in the rural area of Watauga County and exceptional demand for telephone service in those areas.” The cooperative was planning for “providing only 1, 2 and 4-party service throughout the system.”

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Published in: on February 17, 2013 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  

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