The Week of December 18th, 2011

A portrait with the simple inscription “W.B. Greer” shows a Watauga area resident, perhaps from the early decades of the Twentieth Century. Courtesy Historic Boone

December 19, 1912

“Dirty air is far more deadly than dirty water or dirty food,” asserted a brief item in this week’s edition of the Watauga Democrat newspaper. “Dirty air killed at least 6,000 North Carolinians last year. It will probably kill about the same number this year. Will you be one? It is largely a case of take your chances or ventilate.” The item did not mention either a source of statistics for the statewide fatalities reported and predicted, nor more precise details about the action urged by the term “ventilate.”

An advertisement under the heading, “Drives Off a Terror” read, “(t)he chief executioner of death in the winter and spring months is pneumonia. Its advance agents are cold and grip (sic). In any attack by one of these maladies no time should be lost in taking the best medicine available to drive it off. Countless thousands have found this to be Dr. King’s New Discovery. ‘My husband believes it has kept him from having pneumonia three or four times,’ writes Mrs. George Place, Rawsonville, Vt., ‘and for coughs, colds, and croap (sic) we have never found its equal.’ Price 50 cts. And $1.00.” Concludes the ad, “trial bottles free at all druggists.”

December 21, 1939

“Burley House to be Built for Season of 1940,” announced a banner headline on the front page of this week’s newspaper. According to the article, “(s)tockholders in the Mountain Burley Warehouse and other interested persons met Monday evening and laid concrete plans for the building of a second burley warehouse in Boone, and definite assurance is given that the new floor will be open for the opening of the burley season in December, 1940.” Said the write-up, “(t)he new warehouse will be a distinctly separate corporation from the Mountain Burley, it is pointed out, and land for the construction of the second house has already been secured adjoining the present structure. Financing reported by the new company indicated that “sufficient stock  having already been subscribed to take care of the transaction,” the new warehouse’s “papers of incorporation [had been] applied for,” with the chance to purchase stock certificates to be available to “interested persons in this region” in the future.

In related news, it was noted that the already-existing Mountain Burley Warehouse had “sold more than a million pounds of leaf for an average price of around $18.00 per hundred (pounds)” already in the 1939 tobacco auctioning season.

December 17, 1964

“Technical Job of Planning New Hospital Is Going On,” read a headline in this week’s paper, accompanying a photograph captioned “What goes here? Wataugans passed the joint school- hospital bond issue in the fall of 1963. The construction site, formerly the Greer property which is located on Deerfield road, seemed vacant, except for this sign [the photo shows a vacant field with a sign reading, ‘Future Site of Watauga County Hospital’]. The accompanying news article by Rachel Rivers detailed how, “(w)hen the staff of Watauga County Hospital moves into the hospital to be constructed on Deerfield Road, even the food and linen supplies will be there,” thanks to a “great deal of work [which] has been put into planning the new hospital during the last several months.”

Advertisements
Published in: on December 18, 2011 at 12:01 am  Leave a Comment  

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://alookbackatwatauga.wordpress.com/2011/12/18/the-week-of-december-18th-2011/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s